Tag Archives: Hiking

Gratitude Friday

1. Tomatoes, tomatoes, tomatoes from our garden. There’s something meditative about picking them, and it feels so good to be able to share with people who don’t have a garden this year — although yesterday, after about 45 minutes of harvesting and almost running out of containers to put them in, I was ready to put a “free tomatoes, pick your own” sign on the plants out front.

2. Red Table Cafe. *sob* I just learned yesterday that they’ll be closing mid-December because their landlord is raising their rent by 46%. This is my absolutely favorite cafe in Old Town, my favorite place to sit, have important conversations, to laugh and eat. I am going to miss it so much when it’s gone, will enjoy it as much as I can until then.

3. Deva Premal chanting “Om Gum Ganapatayei Namaha, (removing of obstacles).” Every tarot card I’ve pulled this week has been about the need to calm, focus, quiet my mind. This mantra, and specifically Deva’s recording of it, is so helpful.

4. Noosa. How did I not know about this? And in the end, why did it take a California girl to tell me when it’s made only eight miles from my house with milk from the local dairy where I buy ours?!

noosa5. Meditation, yoga, writing — the calm, comforting qualities of practice, constant and known, yet fresh every time.

Bonus Joy: Hiking with my boys. Fall is the best time to hike in Colorado. This past Sunday, we hiked ten miles on the Blue Lake Trail. It was beautiful and awesome.

Day of Rest

As we hiked at Lory State Park this morning, I kept noticing spots that had burnt in recent fires but were now coming back in, green and full of wildflowers. It made me think of how grief is like that, a fire that burns everything, strips it all bare and raw, but how that doesn’t have to be the end of the story. Given time, sunshine and rain, new seed, things grow, the landscape is restored. The destruction isn’t forgotten completely (notice the singed trees in this picture), but rather it forms the foundation for the new growth. It’s a harsh process, but on the other side, there is something like beautiful.